construction

Managing Business Risks with Contractor Contracts

Managing Business Risks with Contractor Contracts

The latest statistics from the Office for National Statistics reveal that self-employed people have increased to 15% of the workforce in the UK. Certain sectors such as construction, IT and technology are particularly affected by this trend, as working with contractors, freelancers and subcontractors are commonplace.

Benefits of Hiring Contractors or Subcontractors

Hiring a contractor or subcontractor to do a job can be very cost-effective as the company does not have to provide sick pay, holiday pay, maternity/paternity pay, pensions or other benefits.

Contractors and subcontractors also have a wealth of experience and knowledge that are often specific to a certain market or sector, so it’s often an ideal solution for expanding businesses to strengthen their position.

What are the Risks of Hiring Contractors or Subcontractors?

While contractors not being employees have certain financial advantages, companies must be aware that they also have to balance the risks that hiring freelancers can incur. One issue is that freelancers could be mistaken for employees by HMRC. Not being able to prove the opposite could lead to hefty fines and penalties.

Other main risks for businesses include:

  • Client ownership: Who owns the client: the contractor or subcontractor?
  • Notice periods: Having no notice period in the contract or agreement could help when determining your IR35 status, as employees usually get notice periods but not contractors.
  • Payment terms: Contractor contracts must clearly indicate any terms for payment that must be observed.
  • Responsibilities and liabilities: Contracts should outline what the contractor can and cannot be liable for.
  • Intellectual property ownership: For some sectors, it is key to consider ownership of intellectual property in contractor agreements in order to avoid further issues.

 

How Can I Manage the Risks of Hiring Contractors or Subcontractors?

By adopting a diligent approach to contractor management and making sure your contractor contracts are thoroughly reviewed, companies can easily manage the risks of hiring a freelancer/contractor, meaning that both parties can benefit from the agreement.

From an HMRC perspective, it’s important to make sure you can differentiate yourself from appearing as an employee by stating the contractor status clearly and have the correct documentation in order to keep HMRC off your back. To do so, it’s essential to cater for the IR35 issue within the contract itself.

Do you have all the correct documentation and contract terms in place? Take the first step towards better protection for your business by getting in touch today.

No Warranty No Clarity

This blog is part 2 of a series of 5 that is preoccupied with small business using contracts to avoid contractual disputes. Court is an expensive pursuit and building self-remedy or clauses into your contract, that are enforceable and offer solutions to problems that may arise is practically useful to small businesses. A considered contract can help you save money, time and effort.

Warranty in simple terms means performance. So outlining how the product or service will perform seems obvious but in many cases, the details provided are scant at best. In many cases, the contract generally fails to outline the key aspects of performance and in turn creates ambiguity. It’s this grey area that can lead to further issues, as during times of dispute, areas of uncertainty become points of discussion or argument.

This gets even more troublesome when there’s a returns policy or a maintenance/service agreement to support post installation or delivery. Stating what is covered by the contract with regards to the basic product’s functionality is one thing but when something breaks or fails to work, what then? Remember these products or service are manufactured and delivered by humans, so things happen, the important thing is outlining what happens next?

Going to the trouble of employing the right contract drafter to ask the right questions and create a contract that is designed to help both parties work together long-term, is worthwhile. Contracts are avoided by those who see no need for outlining the negatives…..but knowing what might happen in the event of….is arguably good customer service and is considerate to both you and your customers time and energy.

The next blog will focus on intellectual property…..

A change in the law leads to new liability for Design and Planners.

Changes to the Construction (Design and Management) regulations 2015, means that those companies (including sole traders), that offer design and planning services to both consumer (householders) and businesses could be liable for health and safety breaches on site even though the builder is the one doing the work.

Not unlike the smoking ban the liability is on those with a lot to lose, the law in that instance targets the smoker through the publican for having a person smoking on the premises, this act pushes the owner to act.  Laws are anthropological, they drive behaviour, whether you agree or disagree with them, it still means the law needs to be adhered to and in the example of the design and planner navigated so their risk is managed and the business protected.

When laws are structured like so, I can’t help but feel more than a little sympathy for the – in this instance – the design and planner who now starts the process of introducing a standard to the chain for events that will lead to a building being built.

We can see why the changes are in place, trying to raise the standard is the goal, the final property will be eligible for warranty and will be re-saleable, a marketable property as opposed to that of a property built based on poor standards which could lead to a disastrous set of circumstances.

This sector is already full of regulation but this new health and Safety legislation will introduce more complexity and challenges for all involved.

So, in a situation where there are multiple contractors, there will be a pressure on design and planning companies to establish the process before a shovel is in the ground.

Create Ts and Cs draft contracts that are relevant to both your business and your industry or sector.  Call us for a quote today 0141 5856384.

Create Ts and Cs provide a bespoke set of Terms and Conditions for your business at a fixed price, this unique approach to individualising commercial Terms and Conditions allow Start up and SME sized businesses the opportunity to protect themselves, manage risk and guard against future unnecessary disputes at an affordable price. Download: terms & conditions | privacy policy